Philadelphia Lacan Study Group

Saint Agatha, by Tiepolo

Saint Agatha, by Tiepolo

The Ecstacy of St. Teresa, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini

The Ecstacy of St. Teresa, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Oedipus

Oedipus explains the riddle of the Sphinx, by J. A. D. Ingres

Detail of Saint Lucy, by del Cossa

Detail of Saint Lucy, by del Cossa

Upcoming Events

Past Events

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 (7 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of my nervous illness. New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

WHERE? Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.

FOR READING LIST: Please email: contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of my nervous illness. New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

WHERE? Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.

FOR READING LIST: Please email: contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of my nervous illness. New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

WHERE? Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
FOR READING LIST: Please email: contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of my nervous illness. New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
FOR MEETING PLACE: Please email: contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of my nervous illness. New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: New York Review of Books, p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.
Main Reading for 10/23/13:
The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book III The Psychoses 1955-1956
W. W. Norton, 1993. Chapters I to III, pp. 3-43.
Additional reading: Memoirs of my nervous illness, Daniel Paul Schreber, (The New York Review of Books, 2000.)
Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

NEW 2013-2014 PROJECT
WRITING AND PSYCHOSIS: LACAN/SCHREBER

“The month of November, 1895, marks an important time in the history of my life and in particular in my own ideas of the possible shaping of my future. … During that time the signs of a transformation into a woman became so marked on my body, that I could no longer ignore the imminent goal at which the whole development was aiming. In the immediately preceding nights my male sexual organ might actually have been retracted had I not resolutely set my will against it, still following the shirring of my sense of manly honor; so near completion was the miracle.” (from Schreber’s Memoirs of My Nervous Illness, New York: New York Review of Books. p. 163)

We will start from Lacan’s reinterpretation of the famous case of Judge Daniel Paul Schreber. Lacan’s reading of the case is unortodox—he replaced Freud’s interpretation of Schreber’s case as being determined by the patient’s “rejection of homosexuality” (for Freud, Schreber had to imagine that he was turning into a woman in order to accept the idea that he was going to have sex with a man or with a male father figure). Lacan stressed transsexual jouissance. In Schreber’s delusion of being transformed into a woman, Lacan found the lineaments for a new theory of sexual identity. Lacan’s original theory of madness will lead us to a broader consideration of writing and psychosis.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Main Reading for 9/25/13:
Freud’s The Schreber Case (Penguin, 2003) or Freud, S. (1911). Psycho-Analytic Notes on an Autobiographical Account of a Case of Paranoia (Dementia Paranoides). The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XII (1911-1913): The Case of Schreber, Papers on Technique and Other Works, 1-82.
Additional reading: Memoirs of my nervous illness, Daniel Paul Schreber, (The New York Review of Books, 2000.)

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Friday, April 26, 2013 (Friday, April 26 to Sunday, April 28, 2013)

PSYCHOANALYSIS AND LAUGHTER--APW STUDY WEEKEND

Affiliated Psychoanalytic Workgroups, The Philadelphia Lacan Group, Das Unbehagen, Fordham University English Department, The Psychoanalysis Workshop at the New School, and the California Psychoanalytic Circle present:
Psychoanalysis and Laughter, an APW Study Weekend
Friday April 26-Sunday April 28, 2013
Fordham, Lincoln Center Campus New York City

“Laughter is America’s most important export.” — Walt Disney

What does psychoanalysis have to tell us about laughter? In his Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious (1905), Freud famously illuminated the Witz’s linguistic and economic properties. Linguistically, the Witz “works” like the dream (by condensation and displacement); economically, it bypasses the “inhibiting factor” both in the teller of the joke and in the listener. Jokes are serious business for Freud: like dreams, they allow aggression an acceptable form, establishing a social tie while satisfying repressed wishes.
Jokes are serious business for Lacan too. Of necessity, the analysand speaks “à coté du vrai” (beside truth) because speech ignores the real. In the symptom, however, the real manifests itself by not stopping, just like the persistent grin of the Cheshire cat. The fact that the cat disappears shows that truth lies, that the fantasy is not all. The real remains beyond truth’s disappearance. Laughter comes from the Greek “gelos.” We read the word first in Homer when the poet describes the gods’ laughter as “Asbestos gelos,” “fireproof or inextinguishable laughter.” Similarly, Lacanian psychoanalysis, which aims at the real by way of equivocation or the half-said, is one long extended joke. And the analysand’s burst of laughter is a proof that the real is touched. The Walt Disney quotation above begs the crucial question: is laughter a critique of ideology or its guarantee?

Register at www.apwonline.org

Scheduled to speak:
Nuar Alsadir, Damir Arsenijevic, Yael Goldman, Olga Cox Cameron, Simon Critchley, Jessica Datema, Todd Dean, Marcel Drach, Ezra Feinberg, Rolf Flor, Michael Stuart Garfinkle, Patricia Gherovici, Russell Grigg, Haukur Ingi Jónasson, Ben Kafka, Todd Kesselman, Patrick Landman, Guy Le Gaufet, David Lichtenstein, Anthony Mangicapra, André Michels, Paola Mieli, Elizabeth Monahan, Geneviève Morel, Jean-Jacques Moscovitz, Dany Nobus, Ray O’Neill, Orna Ophir, Carol Owens, Jean-Michel Rabaté, Steven Reisner, C. Edward Robins, Vanessa Sinclair, Mark Stafford, Manya Steinkoler, Martin Stone, Barbara Tholfsen, Lisa Trahair ,Wilfried Ver Eecke, Richard Vergez, Eve Watson, Jamieson Webster, Martin Winn, P.G.Young.

For information and registration visit www.apwonline.org.

Thursday, April 18, 2013 (7:30 pm to 9:00 pm)

READING SEMINAR

WRITING IS A DOING—New 2013 Project

“Writing is a doing which gives support to thinking.”
Jacques Lacan—closing session of Seminar XXIII, Le Sinthome

In this reading group project we will tackle the enigmatic, elusive, and crucial concept of writing in Lacan’s later work.
We will follow an itinerary through a selection of Lacan’s texts, first opposing the letter to the signifier, then writing to the letter, finally pursuing the question of a performativity of writing as opposed to or combined with an ontology of the Real.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 209, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 (7 :30 pm to 9:00 pm)

READING SEMINAR

WRITING IS A DOING—New 2013 Project

“Writing is a doing which gives support to thinking.”
Jacques Lacan—closing session of Seminar XXIII, Le Sinthome

In this reading group project we will tackle the enigmatic, elusive, and crucial concept of writing in Lacan’s later work.
We will follow an itinerary through a selection of Lacan’s texts, first opposing the letter to the signifier, then writing to the letter, finally pursuing the question of a performativity of writing as opposed to or combined with an ontology of the Real.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Friday, February 22, 2013 (7:00 pm to 8:30 pm)

PUBLIC CONVERSATION with RENATA SALECL

“FROM FORENSIC FRAUD TO THE PERVERSION OF SCIENCE,”

a conversation with Manya Steinkohler moderated by Patricia Gherovici

Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-3513
http://slought.org/content/11517/
February 22, 7:00 pm to 8:30 p.m.

The results of DNA testing and other forms of forensic evidence support an idea of the efficacy of science, of its empirical neutrality, and by extension, of its fundamental accuracy and justness. Yet, we cannot escape the fact that such technologies are frequently compromised by their implementation, by subjective motives driving their application, and by the private issues investigators, technicians, and experts bring to bear on the evidence they yield. Renata Salecl has compiled countless examples of forensic errors and legal fraud. She will use her unique blend of Lacanian analysis and cultural critique to question the myth of a neutral forensic science, finally arguing that one should distinguish “bad science” from “perverted science.”

The New York psychoanalyst and author Manya Steinkoler will respond to her findings, and engage in a conversation with her. The conversation will be moderated by Patricia Gherovici, a Philadelphia psychoanalyst.

Renata Salecl is a Slovene philosopher, sociologist and legal theorist. She is a senior researcher at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law at the University of Ljubljana. She has been a visiting professor at London School of Economics for several years. Every year she lectures for a couple of weeks at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law (New York), on Psychoanalysis and Law. Renata Salecl is a leading scholar on this particular subject. She has also been teaching on neuroscience and law. In 2012 she was also attached as visiting professor at Kings College, London. Her books have been translated into ten languages.

Thursday, February 21, 2013 (7:30 pm to 9:00 pm)

READING SEMINAR

WRITING IS A DOING—New 2013 Project

“Writing is a doing which gives support to thinking.”
Jacques Lacan—closing session of Seminar XXIII, Le Sinthome

In this reading group project we will tackle the enigmatic, elusive, and crucial concept of writing in Lacan’s later work.
We will follow an itinerary through a selection of Lacan’s texts, first opposing the letter to the signifier, then writing to the letter, finally pursuing the question of a performativity of writing as opposed to or combined with an ontology of the Real.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Thursday, January 31, 2013 (7 pm to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

WRITING IS A DOING—New 2013 Project

“Writing is a doing which gives support to thinking.”
Jacques Lacan—closing session of Seminar XXIII, Le Sinthome

In this reading group project we will tackle the enigmatic, elusive, and crucial concept of writing in Lacan’s later work.
We will follow an itinerary through a selection of Lacan’s texts, first opposing the letter to the signifier, then writing to the letter, finally pursuing the question of a performativity of writing as opposed to or combined with an ontology of the Real.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the texts followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Thursday, November 29, 2012 (7 PM TO 8:30 PM)

READING SEMINAR

Les non-dupes errent (Lacan’s Seminar XXI, 1973-1974)

“…if there is one thing about which I rack my brain…[i]t is called Borromean…”
Jacques Lacan, Seminar 21, Les Non-Dupes Errent (Session of 3/12/1974)

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Thursday, November 15, 2012 (7 PM TO 8:30 PM)

READING SEMINAR

Les non-dupes errent (Lacan’s Seminar XXI, 1973-1974)

“…if there is one thing about which I rack my brain…[i]t is called Borromean…”
Jacques Lacan, Seminar 21, Les Non-Dupes Errent (Session of 3/12/1974)

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Thursday, October 18, 2012 (7 PM TO 8:30 PM)

READING SEMINAR

Les Non-Dupes Errent (Lacan’s Seminar XXI, 1973-1974).

“The unduped wander/are mistaken/go astray. That has a funny sound, huh? It is my kind of little air. Or to put things better, a little erre, e, double r, e. You know perhaps what is meant by an erre? It is something like the initial impetus. The impetus of something when what is propelling it stops and it still continues to move on. It nevertheless remains that this sounds strictly the same as les noms du pere (the names of the father.) Namely what I promised to never speak about again. There you are.”
Jacques Lacan, first session of the seminar, 13 November 1973.

In this reading group we engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The seminar is open to everyone interested.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Curated by Patricia Gherovici.
Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Sunday, September 16, 2012 (10 am to 2 pm)

SPECIAL SUMMER PROJECT 2012

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Wrap Up Meeting

We engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The meetings last 3 hours each.
The seminar is open to everyone interested. This is the last of the summer meetings. Meetings take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XXI: Les non-dupes errent (1973-1974).

“The unduped wander/are mistaken. That has a funny sound, huh? It is my kind of little air. Or to put things better, a little erre, e, double r, e. You know perhaps what is meant by an erre? It is something like the initial impetus. The impetus of something when what is propelling it stops and it still continues to move on. It nevertheless remains that this sounds strictly the same as les noms du pere (the names of the father.) Namely what I promised to never speak about again. There you are.”
Jacques Lacan, first session of the seminar, 13 November 1973.

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, August 16, 2012 (7 to 10 pm)

SPECIAL SUMMER PROJECT 2012

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Third Meeting

We engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The meetings last 3 hours each.
The seminar is open to everyone interested. This is the second of three meetings. Meetings take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XXI: Les non-dupes errent (1973-1974).

“The unduped wander/are mistaken. That has a funny sound, huh? It is my kind of little air. Or to put things better, a little erre, e, double r, e. You know perhaps what is meant by an erre? It is something like the initial impetus. The impetus of something when what is propelling it stops and it still continues to move on. It nevertheless remains that this sounds strictly the same as les noms du pere (the names of the father.) Namely what I promised to never speak about again. There you are.”
Jacques Lacan, first session of the seminar, 13 November 1973.

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, July 26, 2012 (7:00 pm to 10:00 pm)

SPECIAL PROJECT SUMMER 2012

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Second Meeting

We engage in a close reading of the seminar followed by a discussion. The meetings last 3 hours each.
The seminar is open to everyone interested. This is the second of three meetings. Meetings take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XXI: Les non-dupes errent (1973-1974).

“The unduped wander/are mistaken. That has a funny sound, huh? It is my kind of little air. Or to put things better, a little erre, e, double r, e. You know perhaps what is meant by an erre? It is something like the initial impetus. The impetus of something when what is propelling it stops and it still continues to move on. It nevertheless remains that this sounds strictly the same as les noms du pere (the names of the father.) Namely what I promised to never speak about again. There you are.”
Jacques Lacan, first session of the seminar, 13 November 1973.

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, June 7, 2012 (7:00 to 10:00 pm)

SPECIAL SUMMER PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—First Meeting

Summer Seminar. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will last 3 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be three meetings starting on June 7, 2012 at 7 pm. They will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XXI: Les non-dupes errent (1973-1974).

“The unduped wander/are mistaken. That has a funny sound, huh? It is my kind of little air. Or to put things better, a little erre, e, double r, e. You know perhaps what is meant by an erre? It is something like the initial impetus. The impetus of something when what is propelling it stops and it still continues to move on. It nevertheless remains that this sounds strictly the same as les noms du pere (the names of the father.) Namely what I promised to never speak about again. There you are.”
Jacques Lacan, first session of the seminar, 13 November 1973.

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, May 17, 2012 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

HEARSAY HERESY: Reading R. S. I

Seminar XXII of Jacques Lacan, 1974-1975

After 1972, Lacan turned his attention to the topology of knots. This seminar is a turning-point because it systematically introduces the Borromean knot. This knot links the three registers of the Symbolic, the Real, and the Imaginary in such a manner that if one ring is cut, the other two are free. Such a knot can change shape but it always retains its properties. This seminar explains that mental and bodily life function topologically, that is according to a logic of jouissance, a libidinized meaning that materializes language. Desire, fantasy and partial drives are shown to be functions of it. Lacan’s theory of knots is not a metaphor, but an accurate way of understanding the subject, and for instance, the topology of knots has direct consequences on the clinic. This is also the seminar in which Lacan announces that Marx and not Freud invented the symptom. The far-reaching clinical and political consequences of this statement will be explored in our discussions.

Meetings are open to everyone interested. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend THE ART OF MADNESS that will be held at Fordham University in New York City, April 27-29, 2012, and the study weekend LACAN’S SEMINAR 22, 23-24 June 2012, in Dublin, Ireland, for information http://www.apwonline.org

Friday, April 27, 2012 (Friday 27 to Sunday 29 )

THE ART OF MADNESS--STUDY WEEKEND IN NYC

Affiliated Psychoanalytic Workgroups and The Philadelphia Lacan Study Group cordially invite you to:
The Art of Madness
A Study Weekend in New York City
April 27 – 29, 2012 Fordham University
Fordham University, Lincoln Center, 60th Street and Columbus Ave, MacMahon Hall, Room 109.

Madness—a term reintroduced in our times as if it were sorely needed—is not merely a doubling of the coldly clinical psychosis. While clearly-diagnosed psychosis is sequestered in hospitals or is nowadays more often contained and controlled in a private regimen of prescriptions and pills, madness is more public, more fluid, more threatening. It is measured only against the social order that somehow always fails to exclude it. It crops up everywhere. Few of us are psychotic, but we all feel at times that we may be a bit mad. If madness is a disturbance in the social, a social disorder that we fear, how strange, then, that one of its products should be art, offered up to the public as if to put madness on display. How strange that the social order accepts and accommodates the art of madness and the madness of art. Our study days will consider this strangeness.

Scheduled to speak:
Richard Boothby, Nestor Braunstein, Shanna Carlson, Fred Casale, Marilyn Charles, Dan Collins, Olga Cox-Cameron, Guy Dana, Todd Dean, Martine Fourré, Michael Garfinkle, Patricia Gherovici, Martin Harries, Reine Henaff-Cohen, Shannon Kelly, Juliet MacCannell, Paola Mieli, Genevieve Morel, Chrysanthi Nigianni, Dany Nobus, Ray O’Neill, Jean-Michel Rabate, Tom Ratekin, Bill Richardson, Ed Robins, Mark Stafford, Manya Steinkoler, Barbara Tholfsen, Jamieson Webster, Stephen Whitworth, Angela Woods.

For information and registration visit www.apwonline.org.

Thursday, April 19, 2012 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

HEARSAY HERESY: Reading R. S. I

Seminar XXII of Jacques Lacan, 1974-1975

After 1972, Lacan turned his attention to the topology of knots. This seminar is a turning-point because it systematically introduces the Borromean knot. This knot links the three registers of the Symbolic, the Real, and the Imaginary in such a manner that if one ring is cut, the other two are free. Such a knot can change shape but it always retains its properties. This seminar explains that mental and bodily life function topologically, that is according to a logic of jouissance, a libidinized meaning that materializes language. Desire, fantasy and partial drives are shown to be functions of it. Lacan’s theory of knots is not a metaphor, but an accurate way of understanding the subject, and for instance, the topology of knots has direct consequences on the clinic. This is also the seminar in which Lacan announces that Marx and not Freud invented the symptom. The far-reaching clinical and political consequences of this statement will be explored in our discussions.

Meetings are open to everyone interested. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend THE ART OF MADNESS that will be held at Fordham University in New York City, April 27-29, 2012, and the study weekend LACAN’S SEMINAR 22, 23-24 June 2012, in Dublin, Ireland, for information http://www.apwonline.org

Thursday, March 29, 2012 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

HEARSAY HERESY: Reading R. S. I

Seminar XXII of Jacques Lacan, 1974-1975

After 1972, Lacan turned his attention to the topology of knots. This seminar is a turning-point because it isystematically introduces the Borromean knot. This knot links the three registers of the Symbolic, the Real, and the Imaginary in such a manner that if one ring is cut, the other two are free. Such a knot can change shape but it always retains its properties. This seminar explains that mental and bodily life function topologically, that is according to a logic of jouissance, a libidinized meaning that materializes language. Desire, fantasy and partial drives are shown to be functions of it. Lacan’s theory of knots is not a metaphor, but an accurate way of understanding the subject, and for instance, the topology of knots has direct consequences on the clinic. This is also the seminar in which Lacan announces that Marx and not Freud invented the symptom. The far-reaching clinical and political consequences of this statement will be explored in our discussions.

Meetings are open to everyone interested. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend THE ART OF MADNESS that will be held at Fordham University in New York City, April 27-29, 2012, and the study weekend LACAN’S SEMINAR 22, 23-24 June 2012, in Dublin, Ireland, for information http://www.apwonline.org

Thursday, February 23, 2012 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

HEARSAY HERESY: Reading R. S. I

Seminar XXII of Jacques Lacan, 1974-1975

After 1972, Lacan turned his attention to the topology of knots. This seminar is a turning-point because it systematically introduces the Borromean knot. This knot links the three registers of the Symbolic, the Real, and the Imaginary in such a manner that if one ring is cut, the other two are free. Such a knot can change shape but it always retains its properties. This seminar explains that mental and bodily life function topologically, that is according to a logic of jouissance, a libidinized meaning that materializes language. Desire, fantasy and partial drives are shown to be functions of it. Lacan’s theory of knots is not a metaphor, but an accurate way of understanding the subject, and for instance, the topology of knots has direct consequences on the clinic. This is also the seminar in which Lacan announces that Marx and not Freud invented the symptom. The far-reaching clinical and political consequences of this statement will be explored in our discussions.

Meetings are open to everyone interested. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend, THE ART OF MADNESS that will be held at Fordham University in New York City, April 27-29, 2012, and the study weekend LACAN’S SEMINAR 22, 23-24 June 2012, in Dublin, Ireland, for information see http://www.apwonline.org

Thursday, January 26, 2012 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

HEARSAY HERESY: Reading R. S. I

Seminar XXII of Jacques Lacan, 1974-1975

After 1972, Lacan turned his attention to the topology of knots. This seminar is a turning-point because it systematically introduces the Borromean knot. This knot links the three registers of the Symbolic, the Real, and the Imaginary in such a manner that if one ring is cut, the other two are free. Such a knot can change shape but it always retains its properties. This seminar explains that mental and bodily life function topologically, that is according to a logic of jouissance, a libidinized meaning that materializes language. Desire, fantasy and partial drives are shown to be functions of it. Lacan’s theory of knots is not a metaphor, but an accurate way of understanding the subject, and for instance, the topology of knots has direct consequences on the clinic. This is also the seminar in which Lacan announces that Marx and not Freud invented the symptom. The far-reaching clinical and political consequences of this statement will be explored in our discussions.

Meetings are open to everyone interested. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend THE ART OF MADNESS that will be held at Fordham University in New York City, April 27-29, 2012, and the study weekend LACAN’S SEMINAR 22, 23-24 June 2012, in Dublin, Ireland, for information http://www.apwonline.org

Thursday, December 15, 2011 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

PHANTASMATIC LOGIC: Reading Lacan’s Seminar XIV

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967). We will give detailed attention to Lacan’s algebra of fantasy. We will assess the role of fantasy in clinical practice, in everyday life, and in cultural productions. We will tackle the grammar of phantasmatic constructions. We will study their effects on the Real or on reality. Does fantasy “frame” the Real (of desire) like a picture placed over a window-frame in order to conceal what is outside? Is really “reality” what people rely on in order to go on dreaming?

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all.

This meeting will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.
Email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, December 1, 2011 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

PHANTASMATIC LOGIC: Reading Lacan’s Seminar XIV

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967). We will give detailed attention to Lacan’s algebra of fantasy. We will assess the role of fantasy in clinical practice, in everyday life, and in cultural productions. We will tackle the grammar of phantasmatic constructions. We will study their effects on the Real or on reality. Does fantasy “frame” the Real (of desire) like a picture placed over a window-frame in order to conceal what is outside? Is really “reality” what people rely on in order to go on dreaming?

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Thursday, November 10, 2011 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

PHANTASMATIC LOGIC: Reading Lacan’s Seminar XIV

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967). We will give detailed attention to Lacan’s algebra of fantasy. We will assess the role of fantasy in clinical practice, in everyday life, and in cultural productions. We will tackle the grammar of phantasmatic constructions. We will study their effects on the Real or on reality. Does fantasy “frame” the Real (of desire) like a picture placed over a window-frame in order to conceal what is outside? Is really “reality” what people rely on in order to go on dreaming?

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 209, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Thursday, October 20, 2011 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

PHANTASMATIC LOGIC: Reading Lacan’s Seminar XIV

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on Lacan’s Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967). We will give detailed attention to Lacan’s algebra of fantasy. We will assess the role of fantasy in clinical practice, in everyday life, and in cultural productions. We will tackle the grammar of phantasmatic constructions. We will study their effects on the Real or on reality. Does fantasy “frame” the Real (of desire) like a picture placed over a window-frame in order to conceal what is outside? Is really “reality” what people rely on in order to go on dreaming?

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Other events of interest:

Fantasy and Markets
Benjamin Cardozo School of Law – Yeshiva University (New York City)
This conference will bring together a number of prominent scholars from around the world who have been studying the relationship of the subject to the market from the perspective of a number of disciplines including law, psychoanalysis, philosophy, sociology and literary studies.
October 23-24, 2011
http://www.cardozo.yu.edu/

Apres-Coup, Act and Transmission: On Formation in Psychoanalysis
Convergencia Colloquium New School for Social Reasearch (New York City)
Psychoanalysts from Europe, South America, and the United States will attend this Colloquium to explore the specificity of the analytic formation, addressing the formations of the unconscious, the analysand’s trajectory, the psychoanalytic act, the transformation and the passage to a different subjective position—underlining the fundamental question of transmission in psychoanalysis.
October 28-30, 2011
http://www.apres-coup.org/

APW Clinical Workstudy Weekend on Jacques Lacan’s Seminar XXIV
Duquesne University (Pittsburg)
October 8-9, 2011
http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html

Saturday, September 17, 2011 (10:30 am to 2:30 pm)

SUMMER 2011 SPECIAL PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Concluding Meeting

The format of the summer seminar is new. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will be on Saturdays and last 4 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be four meetings and they will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via the object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the Unconscious.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend that will be held at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday and Sunday, 8 – 9 October 2011. (additional info http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html)

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Saturday, July 23, 2011 (10:30 am to 2:30 pm)

NEW SUMMER PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Fourth Meeting

The format of the summer seminar is new. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will be on Saturdays and last 4 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be four meetings and they will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via the object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the Unconscious.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend that will be held at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday and Sunday, 8 – 9 October 2011. (additional info http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html)

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Saturday, July 9, 2011 (10:30 am to 2:30 pm)

NEW SUMMER PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Third Meeting

The format of the summer seminar is new. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will be on Saturdays and last 4 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be four meetings and they will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via the object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the Unconscious.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend that will be held at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday and Sunday, 8 – 9 October 2011. (additional info http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html)

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Saturday, June 25, 2011 (10:30 am to 2:30 pm)

NEW SUMMER PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR—Second Meeting

The format of the summer seminar is new. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will be on Saturdays and last 4 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be four meetings and they will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

We will work on Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via the object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the Unconscious.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend that will be held at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday and Sunday, 8 – 9 October 2011. (additional info http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html)

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Saturday, May 21, 2011 (10:30 am to 2:30 pm)

SUMMER 2011 SPECIAL PROJECT

INTENSIVE READING SEMINAR

The format of the summer seminar is new. We will engage in a close reading of the text followed by a discussion. The meetings will be on Saturdays and last 4 hours each.
Meetings are open to everyone interested. There will be four meetings and they will take place in a private office in Center City. The meeting location will be communicated directly to those who want to participate.

First meeting: 5/21/2011.

We will work on Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via the object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the Unconscious.

This seminar will prepare for the Clinical Study Weekend that will be held at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday and Sunday, 8 – 9 October 2011. (additional info http://www.apwonline.org/APW/Announcements.html)

To join this reading seminar email: contact@lacangroup.org

Thursday, April 28, 2011 (7:15 to 8:45 pm)

READING SEMINAR

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Kelly Writers House, Room 202, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE:
WE MEET ON THURSDAY.

Thursday, March 3, 2011 (7:15 to 8:45 pm)

READING SEMINAR

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 209, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE DATE & TIME CHANGE: WE MEET ON THURSDAY 3/3 at 7:15 pm .

Wednesday, February 2, 2011 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE: WE MEET ON WEDNESDAY.

Thursday, December 2, 2010 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE: WE MEET ON WEDNESDAY.

Thursday, October 28, 2010 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE DAY HAS CHANGED: WE NOW MEET ON THURSDAY.

Thursday, October 14, 2010 (6:30 to 7:30 pm)

SPECIAL PRESENTATION

A dialogue with Néstor Braunstein
Renowned psychoanalyst & prolific author.

“Where, when and how is the memory machine set into motion? What degree of fidelity—of authencity—does our first memory contain? Is it something that really happened or is it a foundational myth that we appeal to, recovering it from a dark and unknowable past in response to our current needs? What significance does it have, what meaning can be retroactively given to the moment at which the movie of memory begins? How does that first island emerge, protruding from the ocean of infantile amnesia?” (from Memory and Dread)

Dr. Néstor Braunstein is an Argentinian psychoanalyst who lives and works in Mexico. He has published important books on Freud and Lacan. His recent book (Memoria y espanto o el recuerdo de infancia, Siglo XXI: 2008, Memory and Dread or the Memory of Childhood, Jorge Pinto: 2010) discusses the literary narrative of memory in a very original manner. Conjugating the banal and the terrifying, since “memory starts with dread” Braunstein takes the reader on a “safari hunting for first memories.” From the role of screen memories to that of traumatic memories, Braunstein shows how remembrances impact Freud’s entire theory of psychoanalysis as well as the work of many writers. He discusses for instance Julio Cortazar, Jorge Luis Borges, Garcia Marquez, Jean Piaget, Elias Canetti, and the Catalan writer Nuria Amat. He has written as well on authors like Woolf, Joyce, Perec and Nabokov. Dr. Braunstein will speak in English. This presentation comes to La Casa Latina on October 14, 2010, 6:30 to 7:30pm.

ARCH Building, 2nd floor, Fireside Room
3601 Locust Walk, University of Pennsylvania

Refreshments will be served
Co-sponsored by La Casa Latina, Mex@Penn, Latino Coalition.

Thursday, September 23, 2010 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE DAY HAS CHANGED: WE NOW MEET ON THURSDAY

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 (7:OO pm to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will continue exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Wednesday, March 17, 2010 (7:OO pm to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will continue exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010 (7:OO pm to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will continue exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010 (8 pm to 9:30 pm)

LACAN AT LEUVEN: FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION

Please join us this Wednesday February 17 at 8 pm for the screening of the documentary JACQUES LACAN SPEAKS (1982) by F. Wolff.

“For the first and only time, Jacques Lacan consented to be interviewed by a young journalist from the Belgian public broadcasting network RTBF, because it was a program for the general public. Moreover, uncharacteristically, he gave her permission to film his lecture at the prestigious Catholic University of Leuven. This two-part film is a fascinating and spectacular demonstration of the way Lacan deploys his discourse. He is charming and provocative in front of a large audience, and the next day, during the interview with Françoise Wolff, he reaveals another of his innumerable faces.”

This rare film offers the unique opportunity to watch Lacan harassed by a Belgian Situationist. See what it takes to become “an intellectual hero.”

Kelly Writers House
Room 202
38th and Locust Streets
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia PA

Our activities are free and open to all.

Thursday, January 28, 2010 (7:00 to 8:30 pm)

READING SEMINAR

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

Reading and discussion group exploring Lacan’s grammar of fantasy. We will continue our work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF MEETING DAY TO THURSDAY.

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 (7:OO pm to 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Thursday, December 10, 2009 (6:30 to 8:30 pm)

Capital crime and the art of the "con" artist: The Madoff case

Marcel Drach and Manya Steinkoler in conversation.

Thursday, December 10, 2009; 6:30-8:30 pm
Event organized in collaboration with the Slought Foundation.

Please join us for Capital crime and the art of the “con” artist: The Madoff case
The event is free to the public and will take place in the Slought Foundation galleries.

The public conversation around the Madoff scandal will feature Marcel Drach, Professor in Economics at Paris Dauphine University, and Manya Steinkoler, Associate Professor at Manhattan College CUNY, and is introduced and organized by Patricia Gherovici. This event will explore contemporary economic realities by joining economic analysis with cultural critique. It takes as its starting point Bernie Madoff’s $50 billion Ponzi scheme, the admitted operator of the Ponzi scheme that might be the largest investment fraud in Wall Street history. But the crime is much bigger than Madoff and even his victims. Perhaps Madoff’s crimes enable us to reflect not just on his own behavior but arguably an entire economic system that it has called into question. Was Bernie Madoff the most accomplished ‘pervert’ in the history of capitalism, an elaborate confidence artist who knew how to create desire? Or was he himself a deluded victim of the fundamental shortcomings of the model of late financial capitalism? Did his crime simply consist in guaranteeing ‘normal’ dividends, and what does this tell us about our own psychic relation to economic desire?

Bernard Lawrence “Bernie” Madoff (1938) started his firm in 1960 as a penny stock trader with $5,000 (about $35,000 in 2008 dollars), earned from working as a lifeguard and sprinkler installer. His fledgling business began to grow with the assistance of his father-in-law, accountant Saul Alpern, who referred a circle of friends and their families. Madoff founded the Wall Street firm Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC in 1960. Years later, Madoff would become the Chairman of the NASDAQ stock exchange. On December 10, 2008, Madoff’s sons told authorities that their father had just confessed to them that the asset management arm of his firm was a massive Ponzi scheme; they quoted him as saying it was “one big lie,” one that defrauded nearly 4,800 investors of billions of dollars. Federal investigators believe his investment operation may never have been legitimate. The amount missing from client accounts, including fabricated gains, was almost $65 billion. The court appointed trustee estimated actual losses to investors of $18 billion. On June 29, 2009, he was sentenced to 150 years in prison, the maximum allowed. Ignoring opportunity costs and taxes paid on fictitious profits, less than half of Madoff’s direct investors lost money, however. Nevertheless, Madoff’s personal and business asset freeze has created a chain reaction throughout the world’s business and philanthropic community, closing many, including the Robert I. Lappin Charitable Foundation, the Picower Foundation, and the JEHT Foundation.

Marcel Drach is Professor in Economics at Paris Dauphine university, former Program Director at the Collège international de philosophie (Paris). He is the editor of a special issue of Rue Descartes on “Philosophy and Economy,” (2000) and has written and L’argent -Croyance, mesure, spéculation, Editions La Découverte, 2004. He is currently organizing a 2010 symposium in Paris on the financial and economic aspects of the crisis with economists, philosophers and psychoanalysts.

Manya Steinkoler is Associate Professor, Manhattan College, CUNY. She recently published articles on Biblical Annunciation Narratives, PD James’s Children of Men, Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men. She is currently finishing a novel on the holocaust in Greece as well as a collection of fairy tales.

Patricia Gherovici is a psychoanalyst and the author of The Puerto Rican Syndrome (Other Press, 2003) and Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism (Routledge, forthcoming).

Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut St, Philadelphia. Free to the public. Reservation not required. * Slought Foundation

Wednesday, December 9, 2009 (7 - 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

We are pleased to announce that for this meeting we will have the presence of Dan Collins, who translated Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). He will make a presentation sharing his experience as a translator.

Dan Collins, PhD, MSW, is a teacher and social worker in Buffalo, NY. He is a founding member of Affiliated Psychoanalytic Workgroups, an organization that promotes Lacanian clinical psychoanalysis in the United States. He has translated several works by Jacques Lacan and Jacques-Alain Miller.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009 (7 - 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of the Phantasm (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Wednesday, October 28, 2009 (7 - 8:30 pm)

Reading Seminar

BLUNDERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS: FROM FANTASY TO THE SYMPTOM

We will work on two texts of Lacan, Seminar XIV: The Logic of Phantasy (1966-1967), and Seminar XXIV: L’insu que sait de l’une bévue s’aile à mourre (1976-1977). We will follow Lacan’s progression from his algebra of fantasy via object (a), to the later formulation of love as a failure of the unconscious.

Everyone interested in psychoanalysis is welcome. The reading seminars are an open forum for the discussion of psychoanalysis. Curated by Patricia Gherovici. Seminars are free and open to all. Questions? Email contact@lacangroup.org.

Room 202, Kelly Writers House, 38th and Locust Streets, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009 (6 - 8 pm)

On Being Jewish by Sigmund Freud

Betty Fuks, Eliza Slavet, Liliane Weissberg, and Patricia Gherovici in conversation.

How can Freud help us understand the difference between Jewishness and being Jewish? Can psychoanalysis have original things to say about what makes a person Jewish, and is this identical with Judaism? Was Freud betraying his own people when he asserted that Moses was Egyptian? What does psychoanalysis have to say about “racial fever,” i.e. the unquenchable desire and drive to discover, recount and (sometimes even) invent ancestral memories that might somehow explain the present? Is there any way to think about race without reducing it to racism or to physical differences? The evening conversation at Slought Foundation will take questions such as these as a starting point. The conversation pairs a cultural critic with a psychoanalyst, both of whom have recently authored books on Freud and Jewishness. Moving beyond biographical debates about how Freud felt about Judaism, the conversation will explore his redefinition of Jewishness: what it is, how it is transmitted, and how it has survived. By engaging with the Freudian text, both Fuks and Slavet offer insightful accounts of how Freud invented a unique understanding of Jewishness.

Betty B. Fuks is a psychoanalyst practicing in Brazil. She teaches at the Post-Graduate Program of the Universidade Veiga de Almeida and at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica both in Rio de Janeiro. Her books include Freud e a Cultura (Jorge Zahar, 2003), Freud E A Judeidade : A Vocação Do Exilio (Jorge Zahar, 2008), and Freud and the Invention of Jewishness (Agincourt Press, 2008).

Eliza Slavet has a PhD in Literature from UC San Diego, an MM in Oboe Performance from the Yale School of Music. She has organized several panels, among which the May 2006 New York Public Library discussion of “Freud’s Foreskin: A Sesquicentennial Celebration of the Most Suggestive Circumcision in History.” She has taught at Parsons, the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU, Queens College, CUNY, and UC San Diego. She is the author of Racial Fever: Freud and the Jewish Question (Fordham University Press, 2009).

Liliane Weissberg is Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor in the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of German and Comparative Literature. Her most recent books are a critical edition of Hannah Arendt’s Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess (1997), Cultural Memory and the Construction of Identity (with Dan Ben-Amos, 1999), and Romancing the Shadow: Poe and Race (with J. Gerald Kennedy, 2001).

Patricia Gherovici is a psychoanalyst practicing in Philadephia and New York. She is the author of The Puerto Rican Syndrome (Other Press, 2003) and Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism (Routledge, forthcoming).

Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut St, Philadelphia. Free to the public. Reservation not required.